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20110316
20110316
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is affecting a lot of california college students studying overseas. kraig debro is joining us live to tell us about an urgent memo sent to cu students in japan. >> reporter: according to csu website, they send the most students abroad than any other. we'll be hoping to talk to some officials about their bringing students home even if they are not studying near where the quake zone. chancellor charles reed says he wants all csu students studying in japan to return and he's ordering no more students go to jam japan. we were told the students would be competing for resources. and the japanese people need it more. now, this morning a friend of a csu studying in japan said she cried when she heard the news but he thinks it's for the best. >> it is pretty dangerous. i mean, they would be breathing in dangerous fumes, right? i don't think it's such a bad idea. >> reporter: reed says another reason for bringing students home are the dangers associated with the fukushima nuclear plant. tohuko university has been closed. according to the students from uc are all accounted for and there are no further
. lester will tell us about it in a few minutes. first he has the latest on the ongoing nuclear crisis. good morning, lester. >> reporter: good morning. you have to hand it to the 50 workers there trying their best, but at every turn, a cascading event events throws more obstacles their way. right now this all seems to threaten to overwhelm them. it is a scene playing out on japanese television. trouble at the troubled fukushima daiichi power plant. more information kept coming. the news only getting more confusing. >> translator: we have urged them to evacuate. >> reporter: earlier today it was announced operations at the plant had been suspended. all personnel on site forced to withdraw because of concern about what were thought to be dangerously high radiation levels at the plant. but later, workers were allowed back in. the situation at the power plant is growing more dire each day. satellite imagery from satellites reveals the damage from three explosions in the last four days. it is what you can't see that's troubling. radiation is entering the air. a crack in the containment dom
have changed. it's wednesday, march 16th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set, we have msnbc and "time" magazine senior political analyst mark halperin. the national affairs editor for "new york" magazine, john heilemann and once again, we have the director of the earth institute at columbia university, dr. jeffrey sachs. good to have you on board, gentlemen. >> the "new york times" story, just absolutely gripping. >> we're starting with that. >> you go through the papers and, of course, japan, absolutely dominates the scene. there's "the new york times," "the washington post" talks about radiation fears. "the financial times" talks about how the radiation fears are shaking the market and the "daily news" talks about panic. i don't know if we're quite there yet as far as panic goes but the situation appears more bleak by the day. >> let's get right to it and we can talk about it. the world is watching, a small crew of technicians in japan this morning who are being called the country's last line of defense to prevent an all-out nuclear catastrophe. this morning, the group of
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